Albums to watch

I Don't Like Shit, I Don't Go Outside

Earl Sweatshirt

I Don't Like Shit, I Don't Go Outside

Second full-length album from LA-based rapper and member of hip hop collective Odd Future released by in error earlier on iTunes

ADM rating[?]

7.6

Label
Columbia / Sony
UK Release date
13/04/2015
US Release date
14/04/2015
  1. 10.0 |   The Observer

    No less of a hip-hop landmark than higher-profile recent communiques from Drake and Kendrick Lamar
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  2. 8.3 |   Pretty Much Amazing

    It’s work that positions Earl, both as producer and MC, as a hyper-current presence in the pop landscape, acutely aware of how to manipulate fresh sounds and traditional expectations for his own inscrutable ends
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  3. 8.3 |   A.V. Club

    At just under a half hour, it’s even more understated than its predecessor, with fewer guests, almost no outside producers, less variety—less everything, really
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  4. 8.0 |   The Guardian

    The album staggers by quickly, making it easy to miss a lacerating line here or clever double entendre there. In that respect, it lends itself well to multiple listens
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  5. 8.0 |   Pitchfork

    With nothing to prove and no longer an upstart, Earl sounds, more than ever, simply like himself
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  6. 8.0 |   PopMatters

    Delivers his most personal and artistically compelling collection of music yet
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  7. 8.0 |   Spin

    He seems intent on exorcising his mind, not wallowing in delusion
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  8. 8.0 |   State

    An enthralling record from a rapper who is wise beyond his years
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  9. 8.0 |   NOW

    Wisecracking, carefree and defiantly proud of what he and a group of outré misfits have accomplished
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  10. 8.0 |   The Quietus

    A head-rush of the fullest flavour and minimal fuss – and the taste it leaves in the mouth is one of dirt and blood
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  11. 8.0 |   The 405

    An exceptionally realised and meaningful work from an artist looking well beyond turn up culture in the pursuit of something deeper and longer lasting
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  12. 8.0 |   Exclaim

    While the production is sedated, it allows Earl to highlight (and speak to) themes of anxiety, fame, relationships and loss, raw content far from the fantasy life he's boasted about in the past
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  13. 8.0 |   Mojo

    This portrait of the artist may be a gloomy, oppressive one but it's grimly fascinating nevertheless. Print edition only

  14. 7.6 |   Sputnik Music (staff)

    There's a fair bit of tension in his rhymes and it works for him
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  15. 7.5 |   Consequence Of Sound

    He’s courageous in sharing, but had he pushed the envelope further by filling the album out, I Don’t Like Shit could have been more helpful to a wider audience
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  16. 7.0 |   The Line Of Best Fit

    The art comes first, and as a result, Earl’s produced an album that’s concise, consistent and cerebral
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  17. 7.0 |   Clash

    It's clearer now than ever that Earl Sweatshirt doesn't care for your expectations, and that he's at his brilliant best when refusing to cater to them
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  18. 7.0 |   Rolling Stone

    Raps about his darkest demons on a brilliant, claustrophobic solo set
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  19. 7.0 |   Slant Magazine

    Earl's aversion to clarity means I Don't Like Shit can feel like something of a monochromatic slog, albeit an admirably executed one
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  20. 7.0 |   The Music

    Earl has forged his most focused work to date
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  21. 6.5 |   Beardfood

    The surprise is the lacklustre rapping, which falls well short of his Doris and Earl days
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  22. 6.0 |   The Irish Times

    The sound of an artist slowly adjusting to the world around him
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  23. 6.0 |   NME

    The little dude is a poet. Still, at a relatively lean 30 minutes, it’s hard to argue this is a heavyweight album
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